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Videos uploaded by user “Mount Sinai Parenting Center”
How to Soothe a Newborn
 
04:38
5 Tips to Soothing a Baby 1) Sucking - try a pacifier - many babies are soothed by sucking on a pacifier, your finger or their own hands. Pacifiers are fine to use once breastfeeding latch has been well established, have been shown to decrease the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and should be used when placing your infant down to sleep. Pacifiers should be cleaned and replaced often, never coated in any sweet solutions and should only be offered when you are sure that the infant is not hungry (never delay or replace meals with a pacifier). Never tie pacifiers to the crib or around your child’s neck or hand. At one year of age, you may discuss how – and when – to start weaning your child from the pacifier. 2) Swaddle - most babies love the secure feeling of being swaddled. The swaddle can help soothe a baby and decrease crying from their startle reflex. Swaddles can be done with arms down, arms up by the infant’s face, with one arm out, etc – as long as the infant appears comfortable. Swaddles also need to be snug so that the baby does not easily break out of them (remember, no loose blankets in the crib!) and it is fine to transition to Velcro swaddles as soon as you wish. We recommend removing the swaddle and transitioning to a sleep sack after a couple of months or when your baby is consistently breaking out from the swaddle. Never place a swaddled baby on their side or stomach. Also, remember to make sure your child is not too warm even if it is winter time. 3) Shushing - many babies will quiet down when they hear "white noise" - this can come from a white noise machine, an app on your phone, you saying "shhhhh" close to their ear, or a household sound like a vacuum or hairdryer. 4) Swinging - many babies are calmed by a gentle rocking, swaying or swinging motion. 5) Side/Stomach position - while it isn't safe for babies to sleep on their side or stomach, to calm a crying baby try changing positions and hold them in a side position or on their stomach. Most importantly - NEVER SHAKE A BABY!! To learn more about newborn care, check out our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org
Newborn Bedtime Routine
 
02:19
During the first 3 months you cannot spoil your baby or create bad habits (e.g., by allowing him/her to sleep on your chest while you are awake). However, it can help them to organize their sleep and develop good habits by establishing some patterns. Babies are not automatically programmed to know night from day so it is helpful to start off by creating a “bed” time between 6- 8 pm. Even though you are waking up multiple times a night to feed, make all feedings after your bedtime “night-time” feedings. You can do this by keeping the lights dim, avoiding tv or radio, avoiding eye contact or playing with your baby. In the middle of the night, don’t get your baby too stimulated or over excited and don’t do all the other wonderful things you are doing during the day. Try to establish a soothing routine that puts baby in an awake but drowsy state when you put them down. Babies will learn to put themselves to sleep if you let them fall asleep on their own. Physical space Be sure he/she sleeps in the same place as often as possible. This avoids confusion and allows him/her to grow a sense of his/her own safe place. Create a peaceful space for him/her to sleep. Be respectful of his/her sleeping space. Make it a calming place that is dark and quiet. Very young infants can sleep through almost anything but after a few months, as they become more aware of the world around them, they will not sleep as well with distractions. Think of where your baby sleeps the way you think of how you would like to sleep. You wouldn’t want to sleep with people banging and talking around you either! if you have a lot of noise in your apartment you can use white noise (which sounds like a long, loud hiss) to drown it out. To learn more about newborn care, check out our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org
What is sportscasting and parentese?
 
02:15
Sports Casting A great way to make sure you talk to your baby is “sports casting”, which means going through what you are doing moment-by-moment (i.e., we are giving you a sponge bath right now. We are cleaning your arm, etc.) and saying the steps out loud. For example, if a baby is crying during the sponge bath you would say, “I know this is upsetting you. It is wet and cold. But that is okay, it will be over soon. We are both going to get through this.” Talk to your baby during routine actives, such as changing a diaper or getting dressed. You will be doing 7000 diaper changes in the next 2 years and it is a great opportunity to get in the quality face time! Parentese Families can promote the skill of communicating with their infants by using “infant directed” speech and something we call “parentese.” Parentese means using sing-song voice with words that are sophisticated and grammatically correct. This is a step away from the baby talk (like gaga gugu), which doesn’t help to promote real language. This voice has been shown to be preferred by babies, who like high pitched voices and big facial expressions. Many of us probably naturally do this with babies but there is actual science that this is good for them. To learn more about newborn care, check out our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org
Newborn Feeding
 
01:57
How do you know if the baby is getting enough breastmilk or formula? Monitoring wet diapers in addition to weight is a good way to assess if your baby is getting enough. Babies should have at least 2 wet diapers on day 2, at least on 3 on day 3 and 4 or more from day 4 onward (usually babies will have approximately 4-8 wet diapers a day). If your baby has fewer wet diapers than that, contact your pediatrician. To learn more about newborn care, check out our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org
How to Burp a Newborn
 
03:00
Some babies will burp while feeding, others will not burp regardless of what you do. Some babies get uncomfortable if not burped, while others seem fine. Common burping methods include holding the baby over your shoulder while gently rubbing and patting the back or, holding the baby in a sitting position, supporting the neck and gently patting or rubbing the back. Spitting up is normal, especially when you are burping your baby. If the spit up is milky-looking and is not painful for your baby, we do not worry about it. If there is forceful vomiting, you should contact your pediatrician for further guidance. To learn more about newborn care, check out our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org
How to Bathe a Newborn
 
05:54
Sponge baths are usually recommended until the umbilical cord has fallen off (and if circumcised, until the penis has healed – approximately 1 week). However, there is not strong evidence about the benefit of sponge baths over traditional baths, and if the cord gets a little wet, that is perfectly ok. Bathing is not required daily - a couple of times per week is fine. Remember that babies are not dirty and soap is not needed at every bath. Make sure to give your baby a bath in a safe space, with all your materials ready (so that you don’t leave the baby alone to get something), have extra hands if needed and try and dry the baby as you go to avoid the baby getting too cold. Use clean water throughout and clean corners of a washcloth for the eye area. To learn more about newborn care, check out our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org
What's going on with my newborn's skin?
 
01:45
My baby’s skin is peeling. It is normal for babies to shed the outer layer of dead skin. No special creams or lotions are needed, as that can delay the peeling of skin. If the cracking is deep, an emollient may be used to prevent deep cracking and bleeding. My baby has a rash that looks like little pimples. This usually is a common newborn rash that looks like yellowish pimples surrounded by a red area. This rash does not hurt, does not itch and should go away within 1 week. My baby has small white dots on the nose. This is another common rash caused by hormones from the mother and should also resolve in a few weeks. If your baby has a fever or appears ill and has a rash, contact your pediatrician immediately. My baby’s skin looks yellow. This yellowness of the skin is called jaundice and is very common in newborns. Babies usually have more red blood cells than are needed at birth so they are broken down and produce bilirubin. A small amount of bilirubin is normal to have, but if there is too much bilirubin, the baby may need treatment. If you notice jaundice in your baby, discuss further with your pediatrician. To learn more about newborn care, check out our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org
How to Know if Your Newborn is Too Hot or Too Cold
 
00:59
My baby’s hands and feet sometimes look bluish and feel cold. These areas easily get cold and may turn slightly blue at times. This is normal and should resolve with warming. To learn more about newborn care, check out our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org
Creating a Nighttime Environment for a Newborn
 
01:35
Safe sleep top 10 list: 1. Back to sleep at all times – for naps during day and sleeping at night 2. Firm sleep surface with a fitted sheet 3. No soft objects, toys, or loose bedding 4. Do not smoke or let others smoke around the baby 5. Keep baby in same room as adult but not in bed 6. Pacifiers have been shown to decrease the risk of SIDS 7. Avoid getting too hot while sleeping. Dress in light PJs, keep the room at a temperature that is comfortable for an adult (ideal 68-72° F) 8. Avoid infant positioners or pillows 9. Do not use home SIDS monitors to reduce risk 10. Do “tummy time” when baby is awake and someone is watching Spread the word! Make sure everyone who cares for your baby knows the safe sleep top 10! Tell grandparents, babysitters, and other caregivers to always place him/her on his/her back to sleep in order to reduce the risk of SIDS. Babies who usually sleep on their backs but who are then placed on their stomachs, even for one nap, are at a higher risk for SIDS—so every sleep time counts, even if someone is standing there watching! TIP: Your baby may fall asleep in your arms, stroller or bouncy chair as well. That is fine, it is too early to create bad habits for the first 3 months. But always remember that strollers and bouncy chairs are only safe if you are watching the baby (an awake adult in the room) but never for nighttime sleep or when an adult is not in the room. Also be mindful of weight requirements to use certain devices and get in the habit of always using all belts and buckles. To learn more about newborn care, check out our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org
When to Call the Pediatrician
 
02:26
-Lips or body looks blue -Difficulty breathing – fast, labored breathing where baby is using chest muscles to breath -Baby becomes limp/excessively floppy or non-responsive -Temperature of 100.4° Fahrenheit or above (rectally). -Repeated vomiting, especially if green in color. -Poor feeding/refusing to feed and/or fewer than 3-4 wet diapers in 24 hours. -Extreme sleepiness and/or excessive crying (remember it is normal for babies to sleep a lot at this age and for babies to cry often!) To learn more about newborn care, check out our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org
What's going on with my newborn's breathing?
 
00:42
Sometimes my baby seems to breathe fast. Babies sometimes breathe a little fast, then take a sighing breath and then breath normally again. This irregular pattern of breathing is normal in newborns. However, if you notice your baby consistently breathing fast, working hard to breathe, or he appears blue around the mouth, contact your pediatrician immediately. To learn more about newborn care, check out our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org
Taking a Newborn's Temperature
 
01:18
If your baby feels warm, take the temperature with a rectal thermometer. A fever is a temperature of 100.4° Fahrenheit or above. Call your doctor immediately if the baby has a fever. Babies’ immune systems are not fully mature at this age and they need a full evaluation by a doctor when there is fever. To learn more about newborn care, check out our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org
Understanding Baby Blues and Postpartum Depression
 
02:44
The arrival of a baby is like no other experience in life. As a new mother, you will feel joy, fear, confusion, exhaustion and love. There is also an expected adjustment to the demands of new schedules, routines and the requirements of newborn care. The intensity of feelings after having a child can include impatience, irritability and crying. During the first few days and weeks after giving birth, this is commonly referred to as the “baby blues.” Symptoms, as mentioned above, typically come and go quickly throughout the day and generally do not impact your ability to perform everyday tasks and activities. The most well know perinatal mood and anxiety disorder is postpartum depression. Symptoms can include those listed above, but are more severe and intense and generally do not pass quickly. It is important to discuss any symptoms you may be experiencing with your health care provider (either your OB or your child’s pediatrician) as soon as they appear, so that proper treatment can be arranged. Symptoms of postpartum depression are not signs of weakness or inadequacy, but stem from the emotional and physical adjustments of pregnancy and birth. For further information, contact Postpartum Support International (PSI) at: 1-800-944-4PPD (4773) or visit http://www.postpartum.net/Get-Help.aspx In a crisis or emergency situation, call your healthcare provider or go to the nearest emergency room.
How many bowel movements should my newborn have?
 
01:11
There is a lot of variation in bowel movements. Initially bowel movements are greenish black (called meconium), and then they transition to the more watery yellow color. Many babies will have approximately 4-8 bowel movements a day, however, some will have more than 10 a day and others will have one only every few days. It is common for bowel movements to sometimes be brownish, greenish, and grayish, in addition to the typical soft yellow. If bowel movements are pebble-like, this is likely caused by constipation. Contact your pediatrician if you notice constipation or if you see blood or significant mucus in the bowel movements. To learn more about newborn care, check out our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org
What is sleep training?
 
01:01
At this point it is too early to sleep train or “cry it out.” You can do this after 4 months but make sure to always check with your pediatrician before. If crying it out makes you uncomfortable, there are lots of other strategies. Remember, you can help your baby learn to self-soothe by practicing good sleep habits early and putting your baby to bed awake but drowsy. To learn more about newborn care, check out our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org
How to Keep Your Newborn Healthy
 
01:19
The most important precaution you can take is having everyone around you wash their hands or use hand sanitizer before holding your baby. Close care givers should be vaccinated for whooping cough and influenza (flu). Avoid crowded places and visibly sick people if possible. Try to limit the number of people who handle your baby in the first few weeks of life. TIP: For young children or siblings, we recommend giving specific jobs for “helpers” that involve the top of the baby’s head (hats and kisses) and the baby’s feet (socks and tickling). Avoid face kissing for anyone other than parents. It is ok to take your baby out on a walks, as long as you dress the baby appropriately for the weather. In general, a baby should wear one more layer of clothing than you have on. Check the baby’s nose, feet and back of their neck to gage their temperature and adjust as needed. To learn more about newborn care, check out our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org
How to Take Care of a Newborn's Umbilical Cord
 
01:02
The umbilical cord usually falls off between 1-4 weeks after a baby is born. You do not need to use alcohol or any special lotions on the area. Leave it alone – observation is the only care necessary. Tuck your baby’s diaper below it so that it does not push against the skin and cause irritation. You may notice a small amount of blood and oozing 1-2 days before the separation and 1-2 days after separation. If you notice a bad smell, significant bleeding, or redness around the umbilical area, notify your pediatrician. To learn more about newborn care, check out our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org
Is my newborn getting enough breast milk or formula?
 
00:48
Monitoring wet diapers in addition to weight is a good way to assess if your baby is getting enough. Babies should have at least 2 wet diapers on day 2, at least on 3 on day 3 and 4 or more from day 4 onward (usually babies will have approximately 4-8 wet diapers a day). If your baby has fewer wet diapers than that, contact your pediatrician. To learn more about newborn care, check out our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org
What's going on with my newborn's eyes?
 
00:56
My baby’s eyes are crossing! This can be normal. The baby’s nervous system (including eye movement) is still not fully developed. The eyes should move together normally all the time by age 3-4 months. Can my baby see? Babies can see at 20 feet what a person with good vision can see at 200 feet. My baby’s tears are crusting around his eyes. Sometimes tears do not drain well from the eyes of newborns. This can cause some crusting of the tears around the eyes. If the eyes appear red and/or the crusting is very thick or green, discuss this with your pediatrician. To learn more about newborn care, check out our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org
What's going on with my newborn's head?
 
01:11
There are ridges or spaces on my baby’s head! These are normal – they are the spaces between the bones that make up the skull. My baby’s head shape is funny. When babies are born, the head may seem a little swollen or misshapen due to delivery. This will usually resolve in the first 24-48 hours. Some swellings on the head last longer – make sure to discuss those swellings with your pediatrician. To learn more about newborn care, check out our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org
What is responsive parenting?
 
00:54
Responsive Parenting refers to a caregiver’s ability to watch, understand and respond to their child's communication whether verbally, physically or cognitively. There is a lot of evidence that this sensitive parenting, back and forth talking, and affection between parent and child is fundamental to your baby’s brain, emotional and physical health. It involves observing your baby, noticing and understanding their cues and responding to them with love and consistency. To learn more about newborn care, check out our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org
How to Cut a Baby's Fingernails
 
01:03
When a baby is first born the fingernails are very soft and it can be difficult to separate the skin from the nails. For this reason, it is recommended that you file the nails or to keep the hands covered to prevent scratching during the first week of life. Usually in 1-2 weeks, the nails start to separate from the skin of the finger and clipping of the nail is possible. To learn more about newborn care, check out our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org
Labeling Your Newborn's Cues
 
01:11
We want to try to comment on your child’s actions and reactions to what is happening around them. For example, when they are crying it is great to say “I know that you are feeling sad and crying and I am so sorry.” Also try to look at things that you are talking about (pointing to pictures) or track where the baby is looking and name it for them (“I see you looking at the light, it is very bright!”) Remember to also look for signs that your baby is tired or overstimulated – they need lots of rest. To learn more about newborn care, check out our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org
Understanding Newborn Genitalia
 
00:36
My baby’s genitalia (labia or scrotum) look enlarged and reddish. It is normal for genitalia to be slightly enlarged and redden in a full term baby. This is because of hormones from the mother and should go away with time. My daughter has a white discharge from her vaginal area. Baby girls usually have a white discharge from the vaginal area and occasionally may even have a little blood from this area. Both are because of hormones from the mother and should resolve with time. To learn more about newborn care, check out our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org
What's going on with my newborn's belly?
 
00:47
Babies do not have fully developed abdominal muscles so sometimes their bellies can have a funny shape with a ridge in the center of the belly and the belly button sticking out a little. A belly button that sticks out a lot may be a hernia which your doctor will follow, but usually will resolve by age 2. When babies try to make bowel movements, you may notice them straining a little or passing gas – both are normal. Some babies have many bowel movements, some go a few days in between bowel movements, however, all babies should have their first bowel movement within the first 1-2 days of life. Let your pediatrician know if your baby has not had a bowel movement during this time. To learn more about newborn care, check out our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org
Normal Newborn Noises
 
00:41
My baby sneezes sometimes and sounds congested. It is common for babies to occasionally sneeze. Babies can even sound "congested or snortly". Sometimes this is just milk that has gotten into the back of the nose. Some babies may also have had spit up come out of their nose. If you see mucus in the nose, you may use a bulb syringe (and/or a NoseFrida) to remove the mucus. If the baby is having lots of nasal congestion, especially if he also has a fever or is using extra effort from chest muscles to breath, contact your pediatrician immediately. *Always notify your doctor for any fever (temperature of 100.4° Fahrenheit or above) in a newborn. My baby gets the hiccups and makes sighing/grunting noises sometimes. It is common for babies to hiccup, sigh, and intermittently make grunting noises, especially when sleeping or after they have eaten. To learn more about newborn care, check out our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org
Getting Your Newborn Enough Sleep
 
01:07
Give your baby an opportunity to sleep every 1.5-2 hours. Even if you have visitors, it is okay to put your baby down for a nap. Ideally, we want to put your baby down when he is awake but drowsy. By letting your baby put himself to sleep he will learn how to self-soothe which will be good later when you consider sleep training. Your baby will not give you a long stretch of sleep at this time, but even if baby does you are waking your baby every 3 hours to feed. Make sure not to have the longest stretch in the middle of the day, and encourage the baby to take it at night by doing regular feedings throughout the daytime. To learn more about newborn care, check out our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org
The Mount Sinai Parenting Center
 
01:51
The Mount Sinai Parenting Center’s mission is to prepare all pediatric healthcare providers to support and promote strong parent-child relationships. The Parenting Center aims to transform the delivery of pediatric healthcare nationwide by educating pediatric healthcare providers, offering services for patients and families in need, and conducting research to advance scientific knowledge. To learn more about the Parenting Center, visit our website: www.mountsinaiparenting.org

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