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Videos uploaded by user “Central Washington University”
Roadside Geology - Frenchman Coulee
 
08:38
CWU Geology's Nick Zentner visits the Frenchman Coulee near George, Washington.
Roadside Geology - Vantage Erratics
 
10:36
CWU Geology's Nick Zentner visits the Vantage, Washington.
Snow Removal at CWU
 
01:36
Ever wonder who cleans up the mess when a snowstorm slams Central Washington University? Meet CWU’s unsung heroes—the men and women who shovel, plow, and haul away tons of the white stuff from the miles of roads, paths, and walkways on the 380-acre campus in Ellensburg. TRANSCRIPT Jerry Cummings: I think the average person on campus, be it students or faculty, don’t realize when we get a good snowfall how early sometimes we have to come in. We normally come in at four; if it’s bad enough, we’ll come in at two. And that means, you basically have to get up at 12 to one o’clock to get here on time, and get going on the snow. We like to get this done as soon as possible so the students can get to the dining hall and their classes without any mishaps. We have 12 full-time people, and we have three students right now that help us. I don’t think a lot of people realize how much we have to do, to get all the parking lots, as well as all the routes from the dorms to the dining hall and the classrooms. We’ve got a lot on our docket everyday when it snows. When we get done over a year, we probably have at least 10, 15 football fields worth of snow that we’ll haul. I do the main roads, other than that, I’ve got all the lots on upper campus, it’s something I’ve done for 27 years. It gives you a really good feeling, especially when people you see that it makes a difference in their lives—as far as getting to work, going to class. The nicest thing is when you get thumbs up, smiles, and thank yous. It makes you feel great about the job that you do every day.
Roadside Geology - Yakima River Rocks
 
10:47
CWU Geology's Nick Zentner visits the Yakima River Canyon south of Ellensburg, Washington.
Roadside Geology - CWU's PANGA Lab
 
18:44
All about the work being done with the Pacific Northwest Geodetic Array (PANGA) at Central Washington University.
Exotic Terranes of the Pacific Northwest
 
01:09:23
Central Washington University geology professor Nick Zentner discusses new research supporting the Baja-BC hypothesis. Filmed at the Hal Holmes Center in downtown Ellensburg, Washington. February 21, 2018.
Bridge of the Gods Landslide
 
01:05:22
Central Washington University geology professor Nick Zentner discusses new research on the Bridge of the Gods Landslide in the Columbia River Gorge. Filmed at the Hal Holmes Center in downtown Ellensburg, Washington. March 14, 2018.
Roadside Geology - Thorp Moraine
 
09:37
CWU Geology's Nick Zentner visits Thorp, Washington.
Video Tour of CWU
 
03:07
Central Washington University is located in the center of Washington state. The campus is far enough away from home to explore new, independent life, but close to old friends and family. CWU's century-old campus is both welcoming and beautiful, with a combination of meticulously preserved historic buildings and state-of-the-art new buildings.
Ellensburg Blue Agates: Downtown Geology Lecture Series
 
50:05
Central Washington University professor Nick Zentner discusses the formation of Ellensburg blue agates and how they were transported to the Kittitas Valley. Filmed at the Hal Holmes Center in downtown Ellensburg, Washington. May 15, 2013.
Liberty Gold and the Yellowstone Hotspot
 
58:05
Central Washington University geology professor Nick Zentner discusses the accretion of an oceanic terrane, Siletzia, which set the stage for gold deposition in Liberty, Washington. Siletzia was created by the Yellowstone Hot Spot. Filmed at the Hal Holmes Center in downtown Ellensburg, Washington. February 17, 2016.
Ginkgo Petrified Forest: Downtown Geology Lecture Series
 
50:21
Central Washington University professor Nick Zentner discusses the petrified wood of central Washington. Filmed at the Hal Holmes Center in downtown Ellensburg, Washington. May 22, 2013.
Great Earthquakes of the Pacific Northwest
 
01:04:01
Central Washington University geology professor Nick Zentner discusses field evidence for great earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest including buried soils onshore, turbidites offshore, and CWU Geology’s PANGA data from GPS receivers. Filmed at the Hal Holmes Center in downtown Ellensburg, Washington. February 10, 2016.
Slow Earthquakes:  Downtown Geology Lecture Series
 
01:02:58
CWU Geology's Nick Zentner presents 'Slow Earthquakes: A Trigger?". Topics include Cascadia's great earthquakes and slow earthquakes (ETS events) monitored by GPS stations throughout CWU's PANGA network. Record on October 20, 2010 at Raw Space in beautiful downtown Ellensburg, Washington. 130 folks attended the lecture.
Wenatchee Ice Age Floods: Downtown Geology Lecture Series
 
43:25
CWU Geology's Nick Zentner presents 'Wenatchee: Ice Age Floods". Topics include the bedrock of the Wenatchee area, and evidence for Ice Age floodwater that crept up the Wenatchee River Valley as far as Leavenworth. Record on June 5, 2013 at Ellensburg City Library's Hal Holmes Center in beautiful downtown Ellensburg, Washington. 205 folks attended the lecture.
Palouse Falls & Dry Falls: Downtown Geology Lecture Series
 
44:00
CWU Geology's Nick Zentner presents "Palouse Falls and Dry Falls". Topics include a comparion between two of Washington's most famous Ice Age Floods sites: Palouse Falls and Dry Falls. Record on June 12, 2013 at Ellensburg City Library's Hal Holmes Center in beautiful downtown Ellensburg, Washington. 255 folks attended the lecture.
Roadside Geology - Thorp Lahar
 
09:50
CWU Geology's Nick Zentner visits Thorp, Washington.
Firefighter's Creed
 
06:15
A powerful musical tribute to the firefighters lost in the 2015 Twisp River Fire in Washington state. The Central Washington University Men’s Choir performs "Firefighter’s Creed," an original work by CWU professor of music and renowned composer Vijay Singh. Singh wrote it in honor of firefighters Tom Zbyszewski, Andrew Zajac, and Richard Wheeler who were killed near Twisp, Washington in August 2015. A production of CWU Department of Public Affairs in cooperation with the CWU Department of Music. Recorded in the McIntyre Music building Concert Hall, 2016
General James N. Mattis speaks at CWU Commencement
 
11:44
2011 CWU Commencement keynote speaker James N. Mattis.
Ancient Rivers of the Pacific Northwest
 
57:17
Central Washington University geology professor Nick Zentner discusses Washington’s ancient rivers using old river cobbles, lava-filled valleys, and wind gaps. Filmed at the Hal Holmes Center in downtown Ellensburg, Washington. February 1, 2017.
Mount Stuart:  Downtown Geology Lecture Series
 
58:53
CWU Geology's Nick Zentner presents 'Mount Stuart: A Closer Look". Topics include the granite of Mount Stuart, Washington's Exotic Terranes, and the Baja-BC controversy regarding the origin of Mount Stuart. Record on October 13, 2010 at Raw Space in beautiful downtown Ellensburg, Washington. 115 folks attended the lecture.
Ghost Volcanoes in the Cascades
 
01:11:15
Central Washington University geology professor Nick Zentner discusses new research on ancient volcanoes in the Cascade Range. Filmed at the Hal Holmes Center in downtown Ellensburg, Washington. February 28, 2018.
Rachel Nesvig playing the Hardanger Fiddle
 
02:35
Rachel Nesvig playing the Hardanger Fiddle
Mount Rainier's Osceola Mudflow
 
01:05:52
Central Washington University geology professor Nick Zentner discusses evidence for a large eruption of Mount Rainier 5,600 years ago - the Osceola Mudflow. Filmed at the Hal Holmes Center in downtown Ellensburg, Washington. February 15, 2017.
Nick On The Rocks - Season 3 Premiere
 
01:00:43
CWU geology professor Nick Zentner hosts the debut of 'Nick On The Rocks - Season 3'. All six new episodes (5 minutes each) are featured. Q & A with the crowd is featured. Taped on January 24, 2019 in CWU's Student Union Theater. Executive Producer Linda Schactler and Video Producer/Editor/Director Chris Smart make the episodes possible. Nick On The Rocks - a geology video series - airs on PBS television stations throughout the Pacific Northwest.
Did Humans Witness the Ice Age Floods?
 
01:26:23
Central Washington University geology professor Nick Zentner discusses new research on dating the Ice Age Floods in the Pacific Northwest. Filmed at the Hal Holmes Center in downtown Ellensburg, Washington. March 7, 2018.
Flood Basalts of the Pacific Northwest
 
01:02:35
Central Washington University geology professor Nick Zentner discusses new research on the Columbia River Basalts. Lecture includes comparisons to flood basalts in India and Siberia. Filmed at the Hal Holmes Center in downtown Ellensburg, Washington. January 25, 2017.
Roadside Geology - Dry Falls
 
14:28
CWU Geology's Nick Zentner visits Dry Falls State Park near Coulee City, Washington.
Yakima River Canyon: Downtown Geology Lecture Series
 
49:07
CWU Geology's Nick Zentner presents 'Yakima River Canyon". Topics include river meander development, formation of the Yakima River Canyon, and the 1998 debris flows in the canyon. Record on May 29, 2013 at Ellensburg City Library's Hal Holmes Center in beautiful downtown Ellensburg, Washington. 241 folks attended the lecture.
Mount Rainier: Downtown Geology Lecture Series
 
01:05:22
CWU Geology's Nick Zentner presents 'Mount Rainier Geology". Topics include the Washington's plate tectonic history, Cascade Range history, and a current inventory of Rainier's volcanic deposits. Record on November 3, 2010 at Raw Space in beautiful downtown Ellensburg, Washington. 133 folks attended the lecture.
Schepman one
 
10:06
A condensed lecture on George Kelly's Personal Construct Theory and instructions on how to use the Role Construct Repertory Test to measure the constructs you use to anticipate the future.
"Bing Crosby, the Sunset Highway and the Channeled Scablands"
 
01:01:24
Central Washington University geology professor Nick Zentner delivers this unusual lecture which combines Bing Crosby’s first road trip across the state in 1925, the Sunset Highway, and Glacial Lake Columbia. Filmed at the Hal Holmes Center in downtown Ellensburg, Washington. February 24, 2016.
Tsunami In Our Future: Downtown Geology Lecture Series
 
59:09
CWU Geology's Nick Zentner presents 'Tsunami In Our Future". Topics include Brian Atwater's coastal evidence for the January 26, 1700 great earthquake and Chris Goldfinger's turbidite evidence in Cascadia's submarine canyons offshore. Record on October 20, 2010 at Raw Space in beautiful downtown Ellensburg, Washington. 109 folks attended the lecture.
Kittitas Valley Geology: Downtown Geology Lecture Series
 
01:11:26
CWU Geology's Nick Zentner presents 'Kittitas Valley Geology". Topics include local bedrock layers exposed in central Washington, the Yakima Fold Belt, and recent Ellensburg Formation deposits in Kittitas Valley. Record on November 17, 2010 at Raw Space in beautiful downtown Ellensburg, Washington. 157 folks attended the lecture.
Liberty Gold Mine Geology
 
01:00:02
Central Washington University geology professor Nick Zentner discusses gold deposits in the Swauk Mining District at Liberty, Washington. Includes Q & A with Liberty gold prospector Rob Repin. Zentner reads audience member questions. Filmed at the Hal Holmes Center in downtown Ellensburg, Washington. March 11, 2015.
Natural Science - Mount Rainier
 
53:57
Tom Sission of the U.S. Geological Survey talks in depth about Mount Rainier in Washington State.
Central Rocks Interviews - Richard Waitt
 
28:21
"Missoula Flood Deposits". USGS field geologist Richard Waitt visits Ellensburg to talk about his 40 years of field work devoted to the Ice Age Floods of eastern Washington. Recorded on December 2, 2011.
Floods of Lava & Water: Downtown Geology Lecture Series
 
01:10:18
CWU Geology's Nick Zentner presents "Floods of Lava and Water". Topics include the Washington's Columbia River Basalts (Lava) and Ice Age Floods (Water). Record on November 10, 2010 at Raw Space in beautiful downtown Ellensburg, Washington. 144 folks attended the lecture.
Lake Chelan Geology
 
01:07:18
Central Washington University geology professor Nick Zentner discusses how glaciers created Lake Chelan. Also included - the Chelan Migmatite Complex and the famous 1872 North Cascades earthquake. Filmed at the Hal Holmes Center in downtown Ellensburg, Washington. February 8, 2017.
CWU Basketball has it all!
 
03:56
The sights and sounds at a Central v. Western showdown are epic! This years contest included Grammy award winning singer and CWU alum Michael Wansley aka 'Wanz', plus lots of close game basketball excitment!
Les Misérables at CWU
 
02:17
Quick look at behind the scenes of LES MISÉRABLES performed at CWU's McConnell Hall by the CWU Theatre Ensemble, May 2014. The opening performance is 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 9 in McConnell Auditorium at CWU. Subsequent shows are 7:30 p.m. Saturday, May 10; 2 p.m. Sunday, May 11; 7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 15; 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 16; 7:30 p.m. Saturday, May 17; and 2 p.m. Sunday, May 18. Tickets are available at http://www.cwu.edu/theatre/tickets.
Revolutionary War / French Involvement
 
02:01
Following the American victory at Saratoga, the French became an active ally. The most resounding assistance, however, was at Yorktown. The French naval fleet, under Gen. Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur comte de Rochambeau's leadership, not only ferried continental forces across the Chesapeake Bay, but also provided a blockade against any escape by sea of British forces under Gen. Charles Cornwallis.
Take Flight with Central - CWU Aviation
 
03:48
Central Washington University is the regional leader in professional aviation education. Established in 1975, CWU's aviation program is the only fully accredited public university aviation program in the Pacific Northwest. CWU has a stellar reputation for preparing students for the demands of industry with B.S. degrees in Aviation Management or Professional Pilot. The aviation major attracts individuals with a passion for the combined art and science of aviation.
Welcome To CWU
 
03:10
Welcome to the family at Central Washington University. CWU employs approx. 1500 employees and some of the staff say what they like about working at the university. TRANSCRIPT Woman: Welcome to Central! Melany Peterson: We’re happy to have you become a part of our family, let’s listen and hear what other faculty and staff members have to say. Roslyn Moes: I like working at Central because of the people. I think Central is small enough that you get to know everyone well, but big enough that it still has that university feel. And I think everyone just works really well together, we’re not here for ourselves, we’re here for the students to educate them, and serve them as best we can. James Gaudino: I love working at Central. It isn’t why I like working at Central, it’s why I love working at Central. And it’s a simple answer: it’s the people. The people are friendly, the people are competent, the people are dedicated, and we’re all here for the same reason, and it’s to make our students successful. So, why work at Central? Why not work at Central. Veronica Gomez-Vilchis: What I like about working here at Central is that diverse populations get to feel more at home. And Central is always looking for innovative ways to feel welcome. And my favorite quote that university is adopting is “diversity is being asked to go to the party; but inclusivity is being asked to dance.” Richard DeShields: What I enjoy, the absolute most, is that I get to wear lots of hats - be involved, partner with people, to do things that I’m passionate about, to support my work, but also support the main reason we’re here, which is our students. Andrea Eklund: Why I love working at Central, it’s because of the university itself and how they really value a balance between family and work. I come to work, I love my work, I love my job working with the students, but I also love spending time with my family, and they really value that balance. Also, the location - I love that we’re so close to Seattle, to go and be involved in the industry, and come back here, to a small town, to that real university feel. Laura Portolese: Besides the students and everyone that I get to work with, I would say definitely say the outdoor recreation activities here. I’m a hiker, skiier, biker, and rafter - so you’re all within just a few minutes. Keith Champagne: What I love about Central Washington University is that it’s a place that you can come, and be welcomed, and be encouraged to be the best you can be, and achieve anything you desire to achieve as a professional. Hideki Takei: What I like about Central is that I got a new lifestyle. When I got a job here, I was looking for a job, but at the same time, I got a supporter and a friend. Also, this community is welcoming me, so much. We are foreigner, so we never think about lifestyles here, so when you come to Central Washington, you will get a job, you will have an education, but also you will have life advancement. So your life will be enriched. Mark Perez: What I love about Central is this great campus. And one of the neat things we have as an employee here, is we have this jewel called Wellness Hour -- so every lunchtime we get to go and just work out, do fun sports and activities, swim in the pool, and it’s a great way to just keep overall health and wellness. Welcome to Central (repeated eight times)
Rachel Nesvig playing the Hardanger Fiddle
 
03:08
Rachel Nesvig playing the Hardanger Fiddle
Earthquakes of the Pacific Northwest
 
51:42
Presented by Dr. Tim Melbourne CWU Professor of Geophysics and PANGA Director, Geological Sciences.
New Science Building at CWU
 
02:11
A new science facility opened at Central Washington University in Fall 2016. Science II is home to the Departments of Physics and Geology. SCRIPT Bill Yarwood: Welcome to Science II, Central Washington University’s newest addition to it’s science neighborhood. This $63 million dollar building is the continuation of the university’s development of the science neighborhood. The interesting thing about this building is its design - includes unique features that allow it to be used as a living, learning tool. You’ve got outdoor learning spaces, with native planting; rocks that are actually geologic specimens; there’s a rooftop learning space with telescopes, an observatory tower; on the inside there’s a planetarium; there’s cutting edge technology for labs, classrooms. Bruce Palmquist: Welcome to our new 80-seat planetarium - this is where students at Central can learn about the sky, the community can in and learn about the sky, it’s one of the largest planetariums in the northwest. Susan Kaspari: This is our new freezer room, this is the facility we’re using for storing seasonal snow samples and ice cores. We have snow in here from all over the world, and now we have a couple of students who are working on ice. Student: It’s very cold in here! Andy Piacseck: This is the Anechoic Chamber, this is part of the Acoustics Lab. The echo chamber means no echo, it’s a room with a very special design, all the floors, ceilings, walls, have sound absorbing wedges so that we have no reflection of sound on any surface. And we wanted that in order to study how sound comes off of an object. Chris Mattinson: We’re in the instrumentation lab, this is our brand new scanning electron microscope. This instrument is capable of imaging and analyzing features 20,000x smaller than the width of a human hair; and this instrument is the only capability of its type within 100 miles of campus. Bill Yarwood: So the building is 119,000 square foot facility that’s LEED certified; it reflects the university’s commitment to green building and sustainability.
Central Rocks Interview -  Brian Atwater
 
28:59
"Great Earthquakes and Tsunami". USGS Field Geologist Brian Atwater returns to 'Central Rocks' to discuss great earthquakes that have struck since his first Ellensburg interview in 2006. The 2011 Japan megaguake and tsunami disaster is discussed. Recorded on January 10, 2013.
Central Rocks Interview - Brian Atwater
 
30:01
"Tsunami in the Pacific Northwest" USGS Geologist Brian Atwater visits Ellensburg to discuss tsunami research in the world - including his contribution to tsunami awareness in the Pacific Northwest. Brain touts his new book 'The Orphan Tsunami of 1700", which illustrates the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami which struck the Northwest on January 26, 1700 at 9:00 pm. Parallels between that terrible night and the 2004 Sumatra tsunami are included. Taped on March 3, 2006.