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Search results “Crown of thorns sea star” for the 2018
Daily Scuba News - Robots Are Ready To Kill Crown Of Thorns Starfish
 
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Robots Are Ready To Kill Crown Of Thorns Starfish Vote - http://archive.divernet.com/polls/p322372-diver-awards-2018.html Advice - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLsa9lHcC4ukkP95K-5EfvAinWBGttNVpS Visit our shop - https://www.simplyscuba.com/pages/scuba-shop So as we are all aware that crown of thorns starfish is nibbling away at the Great Barrier Reef. In fact, these little blighters are one of three threats that the great barrier reef encounters every day, the other two being coral bleaching and cyclone damage. Now the other two threats are pretty hard to deal with… but killing the starfish is, to be honest pretty easy. The only issue is that this of course takes time and plenty of man hours to do, But not anymore! Queensland researchers have developed world first robots that have been designed to inject crown of thorns starfish with a lethal injection. ::Contributors:: - ABC News - Laura Garty - NOAA - Mark Newman - Shaun Johnson .................................... Social Links Podcast: https://soundcloud.com/simplyscuba Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/simplyscubauk Twitter: https://twitter.com/SimplyScuba Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/simplyscuba/ To browse our huge range of top brand Scuba gear and equipment for all ages, with fast shipping and 28-day returns, visit http://www.simplyscuba.com For more helpful product videos plus expert scuba diving advice, head to http://www.youtube.com/user/SimplyScuba
Views: 879 Simply Scuba
Crown-Of-Thorns Sea Star, Close-Up Moving On Tube Feet, Mobility Of Seastars
 
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Nature videos of Crown-Of-Thorns, How Seastars Move, Sea Stars, Starfish, Tube Feet, Venomous from around the world. https://www.naturefootage.com/video-clips/PW06_074/crown-of-thorns-sea-star--close-up-moving-on-tube-feet--mobility-of-seastars Crown-Of-Thorns Sea Star, Close-Up Moving On Tube Feet, Mobility Of Seastars
Views: 15 NatureFootage
Dr David Westcott - Crown-of-thorns starfish managment is effective
 
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The predatory crown-of-thorns starfish (COTS) is a key threat to the Great Barrier Reef, in addition to the impacts of climate change, such as coral bleaching and pollution. Outbreaks are becoming more common, believed to be driven by human activity. Recent research shows manual COTS control is effective.
Scientists find mutated starfish with six arms in Galapagos Islands
 
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Starfish are invertebrates with a central disc and five arms. There are species that have a larger number of arms, but this is a crown-of-thorns starfish that is a five armed species. Scientists have debated that this six armed specimen is actually a sub species known as "luidia superba", having first been documented in 1888 of the Pacific coast of Colombia in a single sighting. Although these creatures have not been seen there since, they have recently been found in significant numbers in the Galapagos Islands. These snorkelers were on a tour in the area of Espanola Island in the Galapagos when their guide described the unique creature and explained that there had been some sightings of the animal nearby. Three were sighted that day among thousands of specimens with five arms. Researchers began seeing the six armed starfish in 1977 in a cove off Isabella Island. Sightings have increased in the last 40 years, prompting a debate about the reason for the extra appendage. Some researchers argue that it is a genetic mutation that has led to the development of the sixth arm. Others maintain that the species existed all along but had not been documented or observed frequently due to its rarity and isolated populations. The Galapagos Islands are a unique part of the world because they are relatively young islands, formed in the middle of the ocean through volcanic activity. Land masses that emerged out of the depths of the ocean had no animal life or vegetation. Every single species that now exists on the islands or in the waters surrounding them is cut off from the rest of the world by the vast distance to other land. Too far for most animals to swim or fly, this means that almost all species arrived on floating masses of vegetation or a similar means. They remain completely isolated from other populations and the result is that they have evolved uniquely since the time of their arrival. This adaptation and evolution has provided the world with many clues to our origins. These islands were crucial to Charles Darwin's entire theory of evolution and our understanding of life on earth. Source & embed code: https://rumble.com/v6qs20-mutated-starfish-with-six-arms-are-being-found-in-the-galapagos-islands.html. For licensing, please email [email protected]
Views: 10274 Rumble Viral
Frederieke Kroon: Identifying fish predators to manipulate crown of thorns starfish predation
 
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Population outbreaks of the Crown-of-Thorn seastar (CoTS), Acanthaster cf. solaris, have resulted in a significant decline in coral cover on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). Release of predation pressure remains one of the most likely hypothesised influences on CoTS population dynamics. To inform management of CoTS predators, we aim to identify fish species that predate on different life history stages of CoTS on the GBR. We have developed a highly innovative and non-invasive method to identify CoTS DNA in fish faeces, and successfully applied this in both laboratory and field settings. Specifically, we are applying a genetic marker, developed to identify A. cf. solaris larvae in seawater, to identify potential fish predators of CoTS that may be important as natural controllers. Fish species of interests are those that may prey on larval, post settlement and adult CoTS. So far, CoTS eDNA has been confirmed in faecal matter of three planktivorous fish species, suggesting they may play a role in reducing larval abundance and settlement. Future work will focus on fish species that may prey on settled CoTS, including species that are fished recreationally and commercially. This work will inform CoTS management by recommending approaches around the use of predator manipulation in mitigating CoTS outbreaks. eDNA, fish, fisheries, predation, [email protected]
Crown of Thorns Starfish invasion - SATAFIA  Session in NAPAI - Caluya, Antique, Philippines - April
 
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We faced a Crown of Thorns Starfish invasion and we tried to do damage control with the help of the local pana fishermen. The video was taken in Napai, one single dive-site/pana fishing spot in Caluya Antique, Philippines. in one session more than 1800 pieces got collected and removed. we were only collecting in the shallow area since we have no scuba gear available. Unfortunately the COTS became a constant challenge. Caluya is a group of 10 Islands and it seems the COTS are just moving from island to island and leave a path of destruction. We hope to raise awareness with the locals, that they might organize themselves to maintain their fishing-grounds 'free' of Crown of Thorns Starfish. We tried to offer a small financial incentive of 1php/pcs. for the locals to collect the COTS. in some areas the COTS were like a carpet over the hard corals, a good free-diver is collecting up to 15pcs in one single dive. Special thanks to DFS - German Environmental Consulting for raising awareness on the issue and providing a cash incentive for the fishermen. http://www.dfs-online.de/
Views: 77 Chalchi Caluya
RangerBot: The Robo Reef Protector
 
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Credit: QUT Learn more: http://bit.ly/2POWpDK ✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦ GET SOCIAL ✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦ Subscribe to our QUT channel https://www.youtube.com/user/TheQUTube?sub_confirmation=1 Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/QUTBrisbane/ Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/qutrealworld/ Other QUT social media platforms - https://www.qut.edu.au/about/social-media
Views: 27081 TheQUTube
Looking to the larvae: What causes crown-of-thorns starfish outbreaks on the Great Barrier Reef?
 
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Dr Sven Uthicke from the Australian institute of Marine Science talks about his research into the early life of coral-eating crown-of-thorns starfish. By studying starfish larvae in the National Sea Simulator we can better understand what might drive them to outbreak levels on the Great Barrier Reef.
Scientific report on a crown-of-thorns starfish program changed by RRRC
 
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19/10/2018 Reef company altered scientist's report on crown-of-thorns program — even though he told them not to. https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-10-19/reef-company-altered-scientist-report-crown-of-thorns-program/10391730
Views: 45 Qldaah
Professor Morgan Pratchett discusses crown-of-thorns starfish
 
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Professor Morgan Pratchett talks about why he became a marine sciences researcher and what his work entails. Morgan's current research focuses on major disturbances that affect coral reef ecosystems and here he discusses the crown-of-thorns starfish. Professor Pratchett is a Professorial Research Fellow and Chief Investigator with the ARC Centre of Excellence Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University. This is part of a series of interviews with scientists at James Cook University. The playlist for this series can be found at https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKLwDr1tLWb8eUUouuSKTiuYl-bi5x3qq See https://www.jcu.edu.au/classroom-on-the-reef for further marine science educational resources and to see live footage from our underwater cameras.
This Crab Doesn't Take Kindly to Home Intruders
 
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The crown-of-thorns starfish eats coral reefs; coral reefs happen to be the home of the guard crab. This puts these two tenacious aquatic creatures on a direct collision course. From the Series: David Attenborough's Great Barrier Reef http://bit.ly/2ETj5g8
Views: 12769 Smithsonian Channel
Starfish providing colorful camouflage suddenly hunting sea worms
 
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This is my video about: starfish providing colorful camouflage suddenly hunting sea worms Starfish or sea stars are star-shaped echinoderms belonging to the class Asteroidea. Common usage frequently finds these names being also applied to ophiuroids, which are correctly referred to as brittle stars or "basket stars". About 1,500 species of starfish occur on the seabed in all the world's oceans, from the tropics to frigid polar waters. They are found from the intertidal zone down to abyssal depths, 6,000 m (20,000 ft) below the surface. Starfish are marine invertebrates. They typically have a central disc and five arms, though some species have a larger number of arms. The aboral or upper surface may be smooth, granular or spiny, and is covered with overlapping plates. Many species are brightly coloured in various shades of red or orange, while others are blue, grey or brown. Starfish have tube feet operated by a hydraulic system and a mouth at the centre of the oral or lower surface. They are opportunistic feeders and are mostly predators on benthic invertebrates. Several species have specialized feeding behaviours including eversion of their stomachs and suspension feeding. They have complex life cycles and can reproduce both sexually and asexually. Most can regenerate damaged parts or lost arms and they can shed arms as a means of defence. The Asteroidea occupy several significant ecological roles. Starfish, such as the ochre sea star (Pisaster ochraceus) and the reef sea star (Stichaster australis), have become widely known as examples of the keystone species concept in ecology. The tropical crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci) is a voracious predator of coral throughout the Indo-Pacific region, and the northern Pacific sea star is considered to be one of the world's 100 worst invasive species. SUBSCRIBE NOW: https://goo.gl/3y6gbU ►►►►►►►►► THANKS FOR WATCHING ◄◄◄◄◄◄◄◄◄ ► AND DON'T FORGET TO LIKE COMMENTS AND SUBSCRIBE! #starfish#sea worms#ivmseaanimals
Views: 269 IVM Sea Animals
How to collect Crown of Thorns Starfish with the help of Pana Fishermen - English - COTS Philippines
 
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Crown of Thorns the coral eating Starfish We faced a Crown of Thorns Starfish invasion and we tried to do damage control with the help of the local pana fishermen. Unfortunately the COTS became a constant challenge. Caluya is a group of 10 Islands and it seems the COTS are just moving from island to island and leave a path of destruction. We hope to raise awareness with the locals, that they might organize themselves to maintain their fishing-grounds 'free' of Crown of Thorns Starfish. Special thanks to DFS - German Environmental Consulting for raising awareness on the issue. http://www.dfs-online.de/
Views: 14 Chalchi Caluya
Exploring Okinawa – Crown-of-Thorns Starfish
 
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One of the easiest to encounter hazardous critters in the Okinawa waters is the Crown-of-Thorns Starfish. Learn all about them and how to treat possible stings at: http://diveoki.hmthost.com/crown-of-thorns-starfish
sediment pollution and crown of thorns sea stars
 
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Government links on crown of thorns: http://data.aims.gov.au/waCOTSPage/cotspage.jsp https://www.aims.gov.au/docs/research/biodiversity-ecology/threats/cots.html http://www.gbrmpa.gov.au/about-the-reef/animals/crown-of-thorns-starfish/about-outbreaks Government links on sediment pollution: https://www.reefplan.qld.gov.au/ https://www.aims.gov.au/impact-of-runoff Scientific papers: Caballes, C.F & Pratchett, M.S 2017, ‘Environmental and biological cues for spawning in the crown-of-thorns starfish’, PLoS One, vol. 12, no. 3, p. e0173964, viewed 17 January 2018, PLoS One Database, DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0173964. Lourey, M.J, Ryan, D.A.J & Miller, I.R 2000, ‘Rates of decline and recovery of coral cover on reefs impacted by, recovering from and unaffected by crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci: A regional perspective of the Great Barrier Reef’, Marine Ecology Progress Series, vol. 196, pp. 179-186, Marine Ecology Progress Series Database, viewed 27 January 2018, DOI10.3354/meps196179 2012 study: De’ath, G, Fabricius, K.E, Sweatman, H & Puotinen, M 2012, ‘The 27–year decline of coral cover on the Great Barrier Reef and its causes’, PNAS, vol. 109, no. 44, pp. 17995-17999, viewed 19 January 2018, PNAS, DOI10.1073/pnas.1208909109
Views: 32 s f
Daily Scuba News - Scuba Divers Kill 47,000 Crown Of Thorns Starfish
 
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Scuba Divers Kill 47,000 Crown Of Thorns Starfish ScubaTube - http://bit.ly/2vHQnP7 Fun Vids - http://bit.ly/2mZLTzp Volunteer scuba divers took to the waters of Queensland to help protect Swains Reef. A couple of months ago scuba divers discovered that the crown of thorns starfish has started to eat the coral at the reef and due to the sheer numbers of these starfish the reef would be completely destroyed. .................................... Social Links Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/simplyscubauk Twitter: https://twitter.com/SimplyScuba Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/simplyscuba/ To browse our huge range of top brand Scuba gear and equipment for all ages, with fast shipping and 28-day returns, visit http://www.simplyscuba.com For more helpful product videos plus expert scuba diving advice, head to http://www.youtube.com/user/SimplyScuba
Views: 738 Simply Scuba
Australia unveils starfish-killing robot to protect Barrier Reef
 
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A robot submarine able to hunt and kill the predatory crown-of-thorns starfish devastating the Great Barrier Reef was unveiled by Australian researchers. (AFP) For more videos, visit Arab News: https://bit.ly/2revxC2
Views: 1724 Arab News
Conducting Experiment on Crown-Of-Thorns Starfish (Acanthaster planci) | 21 August 2014
 
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This video was taken during I conducted my final year project for my bachelor degree. My project was titled The Effects of Organic and Inorganic Chemical Treatments On The Crown-Of-Thorns Starfish (Acanthaster planci). The starfish was collected on Bidong Island, near to UMT Research Station, Terengganu, Malaysia. My supervisor was Dr James Tan Chun Hong In the video - I performed chemical treatment by injecting on aboral side of COTs using syringe with needle aided by my supervisor Dr James Tan Chun Hong The video file dated on 21 August 2014 Follow me on Social Media Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/synthec96 Twitter - https://twitter.com/synthec96 #BerikanHaikalDSLR #GiveHaikalDSLR
Views: 111 Hekalium
Interesting facts about crown thorn starfish by weird square
 
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The most, new, latest, shocking, weird, scary, funny, fascinating, interesting and amazing things | facts in the world. The crown-of-thorns starfish, Acanthaster planci, is a large, multiple-armed starfish that usually preys upon hard, or stony, coral polyps (Scleractinia). The crown-of-thorns starfish receives its name from venomous thorn-like spines that cover its upper surface, resembling the biblical crown of thorns. It is one of the largest starfish in the world. A. planci has a very wide Indo-Pacific distribution. It is perhaps most common in Australia, but can occur at tropical and subtropical latitudes from the Red Sea and the east African coast across the Indian Ocean, and across the Pacific Ocean to the west coast of Central America. It occurs where coral reefs or hard coral communities occur in this region. The family Acanthasteridae is monogeneric; its position within the Asteroides is unsettled. It is generally recognised as a distinctly isolated taxon. Recently, Blake concluded from comparative morphology studies of Acanthaster planci that it has strong similarities with various members of the Oreasteridae. He transferred Acanthasteridae from the Spinulosida to the Valvatida and assigned it a position near to the Oreasteridae, from which it appears to be derived.He attributed Acanthaster morphology as possibly evolving in association with its locomotion over irregular coral surfaces in higher energy environments. There is a complication, however, in that Acanthaster is not a monospecific genus and any consideration of the genus must also take into account another species, Acanthaster brevispinus, which lives in a completely different environment. A. brevispinus lives on soft substrates, perhaps buried in the substrate at times like other soft substrate-inhabiting starfish, at moderate depths where presumably the surface is regular and there is little wave action.
Views: 70 Weird Square
Whitney Hoot talks about combating the crown of thorns starfish
 
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Whitney Hoot talks about combating the crown of thorns starfish
Views: 97 kuamnews
Australia unveils starfish-killing robot to protect Barrier Reef
 
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Software will enable the bot to detect crown-of-thorns starfish, which eat coral, and "instigate an injection which is fatal" to the predators. The injection is harmless to other reef creatures. Story: https://www.rappler.com/science-nature/environment/210843-australia-starfish-killing-robot-submarine-protect-great-barrier-reef?utm_source=YouTube&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=Inhouse_video&utm_campaign=science-nature
Views: 1172 Rappler
Crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci)
 
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Crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci) The crown-of-thorns starfish, Acanthaster planci, is a large starfish that preys upon hard, or stony, coral polyps (Scleractinia). The crown-of-thorns starfish receives its name from venomous thorn-like spines that cover its upper surface, resembling the biblical crown of thorns. It is one of the largest starfish in the world. A. planci has a very wide Indo-Pacific distribution. It is perhaps most common in Australia, but can occur at tropical and subtropical latitudes from the Red Sea and the east African coast across the Indian Ocean, and across the Pacific Ocean to the west coast of Central America. It occurs where coral reefs or hard coral communities occur in this region. Scientific name: Acanthaster planci Phylum: Echinodermata Order: Valvatida Class: Asteroidea Family: Acanthasteridae Did you know: Research estimates that if crown-of-thorns starfish predation had not occurred over the past three decades, there would have been a net increase in average coral cover. Media Author: liquidmocean licensed under Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0) More info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crown-of-thorns_starfish
Views: 28 a to z Animals
UNDERWATER SKETCHING - Coral reefs, Hawaii, and Crown of Thorns Starfish! VLOG3
 
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Ever since I saw it as a kid, I've always wanted to sketch underwater, but how? Check out this video to learn a simple way to take your plein air sketching to new depths. Feel free to ask any questions, and if you've dove or snorkled in some fantastic places, share those stories below :) To learn more about Crown of Thorns Starfish in Hawaii - https://tinyurl.com/crownhawaii SOCIAL LINKS My website: http://www.mvprytula.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mariya_illu... Buy me a tea on Ko-fi: http://Ko-fi.com/mariyaillustrates
Views: 782 Mariya Prytula
Crown of Thorns Starfish!
 
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These starfish are notorious for EATING other starfish!
Views: 41 Cichlid City
Starfish Walking on the Beach
 
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DescriptioStarfish or sea stars are star-shaped echinoderms belonging to the class Asteroidea. Common usage frequently finds these names being also applied to ophiuroids, which are correctly referred to as brittle stars or "basket stars". About 1,500 species of starfish occur on the seabed in all the world's oceans, from the tropics to frigid polar waters. They are found from the intertidal zone down to abyssal depths, 6,000 m (20,000 ft) below the surface. Starfish are marine invertebrates. They typically have a central disc and five arms, though some species have a larger number of arms. The aboral or upper surface may be smooth, granular or spiny, and is covered with overlapping plates. Many species are brightly coloured in various shades of red or orange, while others are blue, grey or brown. Starfish have tube feet operated by a hydraulic system and a mouth at the centre of the oral or lower surface. They are opportunistic feeders and are mostly predators on benthic invertebrates. Several species have specialized feeding behaviours including eversion of their stomachs and suspension feeding. They have complex life cycles and can reproduce both sexually and asexually. Most can regenerate damaged parts or lost arms and they can shed arms as a means of defence. The Asteroidea occupy several significant ecological roles. Starfish, such as the ochre sea star (Pisaster ochraceus) and the reef sea star (Stichaster australis), have become widely known as examples of the keystone species concept in ecology. The tropical crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci) is a voracious predator of coral throughout the Indo-Pacific region, and the northern Pacific sea star is considered to be one of the world's 100 worst invasive species. The fossil record for starfish is ancient, dating back to the Ordovician around 450 million years ago, but it is rather sparse, as starfish tend to disintegrate after death. Only the ossicles and spines of the animal are likely to be preserved, making remains hard to locate. With their appealing symmetrical shape, starfish have played a part in literature, legend, design and popular culture. They are sometimes collected as curios, used in design or as logos, and in some cultures, despite possible toxicity, they are eaten.n
Views: 276 Wild Life
Great Barrier Reef: Crown-of-thorns starfish eating their way through coral in major outbreak
 
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Thousands of crown-of-thorns starfish are understood to be eating their way through coral in a major outbreak at the southern end of the Great Barrier Reef, as authorities consider how to tackle the problem.The outbreak on the Swain Reefs off Yeppoon was discovered last year, but the area is remote and hostile, hampering efforts to control the spread of the coral-killing marine animal.The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA) has confirmed it has been working out how to deal with the outbreak since last year.The Authority's director of education, stewardship and partnerships, Fred Nucifora, said monitoring crews went to the area to assess the problem last month."They did some pre-emptive culling on the reefs whilst they were there in December and there is another mission and scheduled for January," Mr Nucifora said.Images and footage provided by GBRMPA show dozens of starfish covering swathes of the reef.Hugh Sweatman from the Australian Institute of Marine Sciences would not put a figure on it, but said the number of starfish counted was high."Very, very high densities [are] being seen, as high as we've seen in the past," Dr Sweatman said, "and as high as you'd expect to see and there'll certainly be a lot of coral lost as a result".He said the starfish, which also have poisonous barbs that are harmful to humans, engulf the corals to eat them."The crown-of-thorns starfish has an extrudable stomach so it lies on top of the coral and it wraps its stomach around the coral," he said."It doesn't actually break bits off the coral, it just digests the tissue off the of the skeleton … it's very effective at that." The starfish is native to the reef but when numbers explode, the results can be devastating, as thousands of the creatures munch their way through the coral."Each starfish eats about its body diameter a night and so over time that mounts up very significantly," Dr Sweatman said.Dr Sweatman said the reef could recover but a major culling operation would be needed to give the area the best chance.The Federal Government and the Association of Marine Park Tourism Operators, runs "control" or culling operations and the Government is seeking tender applications for a third boat dedicated to culling the starfish.Mr Nucifora said the "control" measures have been focused on specific areas."Particularly in the far northern, northern and central sections of the Marine Park, at this point in time, and those reefs that have been identified as high tourism and high ecological value have been primary targets to this point," he said.Because the Swain Reefs are so far offshore and are not in the areas identified as priorities for controlling crown-of-thorns outbreaks it is unclear how the major culling program needed would be funded and resourced.The cause of the outbreak has scientists and the Marine Park Authority stumped."That's the million dollar question to be perfectly honest," Mr Nucifora said.Typically scientists link outbreaks of the crown
Views: 341 Spirit martial arts
Australia: Predator starfish poses threat to Great Barrier Reef
 
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The return of coral-eating Crown of Thorns Starfish has made them a target of a search and destroy mission off Australia's Queensland coast. The Starfish have returned after decades to feast on the Great Barrier Reef, a world heritage and a major tourist attraction. The feasting process begins by the starfish spreading its stomach over the corals and using digestive enzymes to liquefy the coral tissue. To kill the invaders, the scientists suggest injecting them with bile salts. In the Swains Reef at the southern edge of the larger reef system which is under stress due to coral bleaching, a result of climate change according to the scientists, the outbreak took place. Production of extra nutrients in the water has compelled the invasion by the starfish but the scientists are still unknown of the reason behind their return. Subscribe to Times Of India's Youtube channel here: http://goo.gl/WgIatu Also Subscribe to Bombay Times Youtube Channel here: http://goo.gl/AdXcgU Social Media Links: Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/TimesofIndia Twitter : https://twitter.com/timesofindia Google + : https://plus.google.com/u/0/+timesindia/posts
Views: 884 The Times of India
Crown of thorn starfish and the great barrier reef #2018scch100 #2018SCCH110 #mu6005506
 
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assignment3 The king destroyer COTS this video is not permitted to be used in another purposes
Collecting Crown-Of-Thorns Starfish (Acanthaster planci) | 18 August 2014
 
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This video was taken during I conducted my final year project for my bachelor degree. My project was titled The Effects of Organic and Inorganic Chemical Treatments On The Crown-Of-Thorns Starfish (Acanthaster planci). The starfish was collected on Bidong Island, near to UMT Research Station, Terengganu, Malaysia. My supervisor was Dr James Tan Chun Hong The video file dated on 18 August 2014 Follow me on Social Media Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/synthec96 Twitter - https://twitter.com/synthec96 #BerikanHaikalDSLR #GiveHaikalDSLR
Views: 79 Hekalium
BBC: Wild/South Pacific: Crown Of Thorns Starfish and Triton’s Trumpet Seasnails
 
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For my awesome marine biology teacher from school, Mr. William Madden.
Views: 6 Michael Burns
Crown-of-thorns starfish
 
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Crown-of-thorns starfish (coral eating starfish)
To Save Coral Reefs, Robot Hunts Starfish
 
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The robot apocalypse has arrived, for crown-of thorns starfish. According to the Mother Nature Network, a marine robot is hunting the starfish. And it's doing so to save coral reefs The invasive species, which destroys coral reefs, is the target of the underwater robot. When their population is under control, they serve to balance the Great Barrier Reef ecosystem . But when the crown-of-thorns starfish population booms, they become a plague. They are able to consume coral reefs with a frenzied and destructive fervor. Scientists believe they're responsible for 40% of the Great Barrier Reef’s total decline in coral cover. Which is why Queensland University of Technology researchers created a killer robot. Called COTSbot, its singular purpose is to seek and destroy crown-of-thorns starfish. Capable of diving for as long as eight hours, It injects starfish with a lethal brew of bile salts. It is equipped with stereoscopic cameras for depth perception and 5 thrusters for stability. It also has GPS and pitch-and-roll sensors, as well as pneumatic injection arm. Scientists hope a fleet of COTSbots might restore balance to the fragile ecology of the Great Barrier Reef. https://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/animals/stories/researchers-create-terminator-marine-robot-hunts-starfish http://www.wochit.com This video was produced by YT Wochit Tech using http://wochit.com
Views: 141 Wochit Tech
Got COTS? Using vinegar to cull crown-of-thorns starfish
 
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Thinking of using vinegar to control localised outbreaks of the Crown-of-thorns starfish? Here's a short video to explain the method and things to consider before you get started. Lots more information on lisa-bostrom-einarsson.com/cots-control Read my first paper on the method here: https://rdcu.be/OIUS Read my second paper describing the impact assessment here: https://bit.ly/2IxHytK
David Westcott: Synthesis Discussion: Crown of Thorns Starfish on the Great Barrier Reef
 
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David Westcott leads synthesis discussion for presentations on the subject of Crown of Thorns Starfish at the Great Barrier Reef Restoration Symposium.
Collecting Crown-Of-Thorns Starfish (Acanthaster planci) | 17 August 2014
 
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This video was taken during I conducted my final year project for my bachelor degree. My project was titled The Effects of Organic and Inorganic Chemical Treatments On The Crown-Of-Thorns Starfish (Acanthaster planci). The starfish was collected on Bidong Island, near to UMT Research Station, Terengganu, Malaysia. My supervisor was Dr James Tan Chun Hong In the video - Asma (pink shirt) and Wee Hin Boo (next to Asma) try to collect COTs starfish The video file dated on 17 August 2014 Follow me on Social Media Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/synthec96 Twitter - https://twitter.com/synthec96 #BerikanHaikalDSLR #GiveHaikalDSLR
Views: 109 Hekalium
Underwater RangerBot hunts coral-killing starfish
 
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The RangerBot underwater drone has been developed by Australian scientists to help tackle an outbreak of coral-eating crown-of-thorns starfish on the Great Barrier Reef.
Views: 584 Sharjah24 News
47,000 crown-of-thorns cull in the Great Barrier Reef
 
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Footage from volunteer divers killing 47,000 crown-of-thorns sea starts in the southern Great Barrier Reef. Narrated by Diane Lanyon, GM of Ecosure Videos sourced with thanks from Amanda Delaforce, Wayne Hubbard, Mark Priest, Lachlan and Daniel Clifton while on the trip
Views: 75 Ecosure
Predator starfish posses threat to Great Barrier Reef
 
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Townsville (Australia), Jan 06 (ANI): The return of coral-eating Crown of Thorns Starfish has made them a target of a search and destroy mission off Australia's Queensland coast. The Starfish have returned after decades to feast on the Great Barrier Reef, a world heritage and a major tourist attraction. The feasting process begins by the starfish spreading its stomach over the corals and using digestive enzymes to liquefy the coral tissue. To kill the invaders, the scientists suggest injecting them with bile salts. In the Swains Reef at the southern edge of the larger reef system which is under stress due to coral bleaching, a result of climate change according to the scientists, the outbreak took place. Production of extra nutrients in the water has compelled the invasion by the starfish but the scientists are still unknown of the reason behind their return. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ☛ Subscribe to our Youtube Channel - https://goo.gl/k1Aee1 ☛ Visit our Official website: https://www.aninews.in/ Enjoy and stay connected with us!! ☛ Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ANINEWS.IN ☛Follow us : https://twitter.com/ANI ☛ Circle us : https://goo.gl/QN5kXy ☛ Contact us : [email protected]
Views: 58 ANI News Official
STARFISH TENTACLES
 
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Starfish or sea stars are star-shaped echinoderms belonging to the class Asteroidea. Common usage frequently finds these names being also applied to ophiuroids, which are correctly referred to as brittle stars or "basket stars". About 1,500 species of starfish occur on the seabed in all the world's oceans, from the tropics to frigid polar waters. They are found from the intertidal zone down to abyssal depths, 6,000 m (20,000 ft) below the surface. Starfish are marine invertebrates. They typically have a central disc and five arms, though some species have a larger number of arms. The aboral or upper surface may be smooth, granular or spiny, and is covered with overlapping plates. Many species are brightly coloured in various shades of red or orange, while others are blue, grey or brown. Starfish have tube feet operated by a hydraulic system and a mouth at the centre of the oral or lower surface. They are opportunistic feeders and are mostly predators on benthic invertebrates. Several species have specialized feeding behaviours including eversion of their stomachs and suspension feeding. They have complex life cycles and can reproduce both sexually and asexually. Most can regenerate damaged parts or lost arms and they can shed arms as a means of defence. The Asteroidea occupy several significant ecological roles. Starfish, such as the ochre sea star (Pisaster ochraceus) and the reef sea star (Stichaster australis), have become widely known as examples of the keystone species concept in ecology. The tropical crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster planci) is a voracious predator of coral throughout the Indo-Pacific region, and the northern Pacific sea star is considered to be one of the world's 100 worst invasive species. The fossil record for starfish is ancient, dating back to the Ordovician around 450 million years ago, but it is rather poor, as starfish tend to disintegrate after death. Only the ossicles and spines of the animal are likely to be preserved, making remains hard to locate. With their appealing symmetrical shape, starfish have played a part in literature, legend, design and popular culture. They are sometimes collected as curios, used in design or as logos, and in some cultures, despite possible toxicity, they are eaten.
Views: 30 Impact 2
Triton Trumpet Attacks Crown Of Thorns
 
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NatureFootage offers HD to UltraHD 4K and 8K video stock footage including Triton Trumpet Snail. https://www.naturefootage.com/video-clips/HH01_107/triton-trumpet-attacks-crown-of-thorns Triton Trumpet Attacks Crown Of Thorns
Views: 33 NatureFootage
Triton Trumpet Attacks Crown Of Thorns
 
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Largest collection of Triton Trumpet Snail videos. https://www.naturefootage.com/video-clips/HH01_106/triton-trumpet-attacks-crown-of-thorns Triton Trumpet Attacks Crown Of Thorns
Views: 29 NatureFootage
Crown of Thorns Starfish
 
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If you're looking forward to learning about the Crown of Thorn Starfish watch this!!!!! Subscribe and hit the Like button!!!!
RangerBot: autonomous underwater drone that could be of great help to the reef
 
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RangerBot: autonomous underwater drone that could be of great help to the reef Scientists in Australia have developed an autonomous underwater drone that could be of great help. Known as RangerBot, the prototype device was developed through a partnership between the Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Google and the Great Barrier Reef Foundation. The drone is programmed with a tablet while it is still on the surface: the process can be learned in 15 minutes. Once immersed, use a computer vision system to avoid obstacles and to navigate. That system, along with other sensors, also allows you to detect and record reef problems, such as coral bleaching, poor water quality, pollution, sedimentation and pest species. In the case of the latter, the drone is able to identify sea stars crown of thorns that eat coral with a rate of accuracy of 99.4 percent. When it does, you can inject a poison that does not affect other reef organisms; its predecessor, the COTSbot, is capable of doing the same.Including the scales at 15 kg, the 75 cm long RangerBot has a battery life of approximately eight hours per charge.
Views: 98 Aban Tech
Removing Crown of Thorn's Starfish (COT's) Raja Ampat 2018
 
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If you find an outbreak, it's easy to remove COT's! Just get on with it! COT's in large numbers will kill a reef in a very short time so, if you want to save reefs, get out there and remove them!
Views: 111 Norman van't Hoff
Protecting coral on the Great Barrier Reef - crown-of-thorns starfish control program
 
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Assistant Director of the Crown-of-Thorns control program Mary Bonnin provides an update on the crown-of-thorns starfish control program.
COTS Outbreak
 
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COTS Outbreak The Crown of Thorn Starfish is a keystone species because it regulates coral population. However when faced with rising sea temperatures and high nutrition levels, the population of this species rises more than necessary and that causes whole coral reefs to be bleached by this species. A teaser for our booth that will be featuring the "Crown of Thorns Starfish" for the "Ateneo Biodiversity Fair" happening at December 3 - 7, 2018 at the SEC B and C foyer. Visit us and get a chance to play games and talk about the issue surrounding the Crown of Thorn Starfish. Video by: Amrbosio, Jenica Avila, Eduard Cisnero, Jhune Sahagun, Marcus Sources https://www.aims.gov.au/docs/research/biodiversity-ecology/threats/cots.html http://www.qm.qld.gov.au/microsites/biodiscovery/05human-impact/importance-of-coral-reefs.html http://wwf.panda.org/our_work/oceans/coasts/coral_reefs/coral_importance/ https://www.livingoceansfoundation.org/poisoning-cots-or-removal-by-hand/ https://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-04-22/new-method-kills-more-than-2502c000-crown-of-thorns-starfish-o/5403600 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/223552098_Philippine_Coral_Reefs_ Under_Threat_The_Economic_Losses_Caused_by_Reef_Destruction# https://www.smh.com.au/environment/climate-change/reefeating-crownofthorns -starfish-spurred-on-by-rising-sea-temperatures-20150212-13cz6o.html https://www.marineconservationphilippines.org/crown-thorn-starfish-removal-si quijor/
Crown of Thorns Starfish Control Program with AMPTO - CitizensGBR & Madatha's Travels
 
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I spent a week with the amazing crew working for AMPTO, where they spend their time controlling the Crown of Thorns Starfish outbreak along the East coast of Australia. To find out more information, you can visit www.gbrmpa.gov.au. You can also help the Great Barrier Reef from anywhere in the world, by signing up to become a Citizen today at www.citizensgbr.org. Special thanks to: Steve Moon - COTSCP Project Manager AMPTO Crew of the Venus ll Citizens of the Great Barrier Reef STA Travel
Crown of Thorns Control Program
 
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As part of National Science Week, we're chatting about our Great Barrier Reef crown-of-thorns starfish control program. More information about the crown-of-thorns starfish: http://www.gbrmpa.gov.au/about-the-reef/animals/crown-of-thorns-starfish Learn about the reef: http://www.gbrmpa.gov.au/learn-about-the-reef/resources-by-theme Reef Beat education series: http://www.gbrmpa.gov.au/learn-about-the-reef/reef-beat-series Teaching resources: http://www.gbrmpa.gov.au/learn-about-the-reef/resources-by-grade

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