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MSU Raising an Orphan Foal
 
01:23
Meet Orphan Annie and Uncle Bentley, 2 popular residents on the MSU Horse Teaching and Research Center.
Views: 417 MSU Extension
Breyer horse series: The Lost Arabian Trailer
 
00:48
This is my first ever Breyer series and I think its the first one in a desert so Im quite happy! I hope you like it. PLOT: Its about an Arabian foal that gets lost in a herd of arabians heading to the village controled by Arabian men. The little foal named Amai needs to survive all by her self without her mother. The foal grows into a beautiful Arabian filly wich hasnt encounterd with any other horses or human.
Views: 786 Tyrahorses
AHACO Arabian Western Pleasure Championship Junior Rider
 
06:57
Purebred western pleasure horses with 17 & under riders
Views: 206 risingrainbow2
TF Silas Marner - First taste of freedom
 
01:56
Here's Silas taking his first somewhat wibbly wobbly steps to freedom with Nick and his lovely uncle B (San Barbados aged 28 and now uncle to 2 orphan foals = worth his weight in the yellow stuff!). This is day 5 and he really is starting to blossom now, after a couple of days building strength and getting the hang of life.
Views: 1251 Louise Wilsden
Jacqueline Kennedy: White House Tour - Documentary Film
 
53:43
Jacqueline "Jackie" Lee Bouvier Kennedy Onassis (July 28, 1929 -- May 19, 1994) was the wife of the 35th President of the U.S., John F. Kennedy, and First Lady of the U.S. during his presidency from 1961 until his assassination in 1963. More: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000BRNGCG/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B000BRNGCG&linkCode=as2&tag=tra0c7-20&linkId=4ae0b59d74cf4b82b4cf911ae40944a4 Five years later she married Greek shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis; they remained married until his death in 1975. For the final two decades of her life, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis had a career as a book editor. She is remembered for her contributions to the arts and preservation of historic architecture, her style, elegance, and grace. A fashion icon, her famous pink Chanel suit has become a symbol of her husband's assassination and one of the lasting images of the 1960s. A book containing the transcripts of interviews with Kennedy from 1964 was released in September, 2011. The restoration of the White House was Kennedy's first major project as First Lady. She was dismayed during her pre-inauguration tour of the White House to find little of historic significance in the house. The rooms were furnished with undistinguished pieces that she felt lacked a sense of history. Her first efforts, begun her first day in residence (with the help of society decorator Sister Parish), were to make the family quarters attractive and suitable for family life. Among these changes was the addition of a kitchen on the family floor and rooms for her children. Upon almost immediately exhausting the funds appropriated for this effort, Kennedy established a fine arts committee to oversee and fund the restoration process and asked early American furniture expert Henry du Pont to consult.[39] While her initial management of the project was hardly noted at the time, later accounts have noted that she managed the conflicting agendas of Parish, du Pont, and Boudin with seamless success;[40] she initiated publication of the first White House guidebook, whose sales further funded the restoration; she initiated a Congressional bill establishing that White House furnishings would be the property of the Smithsonian Institution, rather than available to departing ex-presidents to claim as their own; and she wrote personal requests to those who owned pieces of historical interest that might be, and later were, donated to the White House.[41] On February 14, 1962, Kennedy took American television viewers on a tour of the White House with Charles Collingwood of CBS News. In the tour she said, "I just feel that everything in the White House should be the best—the entertainment that's given here. If it's an American company you can help, I like to do that. If not—just as long as it's the best."[40] Working with Rachel Lambert Mellon, she oversaw redesign and replanting of the White House Rose Garden and the East Garden, which was renamed the Jacqueline Kennedy Garden after her husband's assassination. Her efforts on behalf of restoration and preservation at the White House left a lasting legacy in the form of the White House Historical Association, the Committee for the Preservation of the White House which was based upon her White House Furnishings Committee, a permanent Curator of the White House, the White House Endowment Trust, and the White House Acquisition Trust.[40] Broadcasting of the White House restoration greatly helped the Kennedy administration.[40] The U.S. government sought international support during the Cold War, which it achieved by affecting public opinion. The First Lady's celebrity and high profile status made viewing the tour of the White House very desirable. The tour was filmed and distributed to 106 countries since there was a great demand to see the film. In 1962 at the 14th Annual Emmy Awards (NBC, May 22), Bob Newhart emceed from the Hollywood Palladium; Johnny Carson from the New York Astor Hotel; and NBC newsman David Brinkley hosted at the Sheraton Park Hotel in Washington D.C., and took the spotlight as a special Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Trustees Award was given to Jacqueline Kennedy for her CBS-TV tour of the White House. Lady Bird Johnson accepted for the camera-shy First Lady. The Emmy statuette is on display in the Kennedy Library located in Boston, Massachusetts. Focus and admiration for Jacqueline Kennedy took negative attention away from her husband. By attracting worldwide public attention, the First Lady gained allies for the White House and international support for the Kennedy administration and its Cold War policies.[42] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jackie_Kennedy
Views: 1007432 The Film Archives
Arabian Horses 2010 GlebeFarm Filly Foal by Saudee.wmv
 
04:09
Stunning filly by Saudee born 11th April 2010 out of Negev Spirit of Aswan an advanced endurance mare, with Egyptian/Crabbet bloodlines by Escapade, she will eventually go grey
Views: 819 glebefarmarabians
Suspense: Tree of Life / The Will to Power / Overture in Two Keys
 
01:32:25
Alfred Hitchcock's first thriller was his third silent film The Lodger (1926), a suspenseful Jack the Ripper story. His next thriller was Blackmail (1929), his and Britain's first sound film. Of Hitchcock's fifteen major features made between 1925 and 1935, only six were suspense films, the two mentioned above plus Murder!, Number Seventeen, The Man Who Knew Too Much, and The 39 Steps. From 1935 on, however, most of his output was thrillers. One of the earliest spy films was Fritz Lang's Spies (1928), the director's first independent production, with an anarchist international conspirator and criminal spy character named Haghi (Rudolf Klein-Rogge), who was pursued by good-guy Agent No. 326 (Willy Fritsch) (aka Det. Donald Tremaine, English version) -- this film anticipated the James Bond films of the future. Another was Greta Garbo's portrayal of the real-life, notorious, seductive German double agent code-named Mata Hari (Gertrud Zelle) in World War I in Mata Hari (1932), who performed a pearl-draped dance to entice French officers to divulge their secrets. The chilling German film M (1931) directed by Fritz Lang, starred Peter Lorre (in his first film role) as a criminal deviant who preys on children. The film's story was based on the life of serial killer Peter Kurten (known as the 'Vampire of Düsseldorf'). Edward Sutherland's crime thriller Murders in the Zoo (1933) from Paramount starred Lionel Atwill as a murderous and jealous zoologist. Other British directors, such as Walter Forde, Victor Saville, George A. Cooper, and even the young Michael Powell made more thrillers in the same period; Forde made nine, Vorhaus seven between 1932 and 1935, Cooper six in the same period, and Powell the same. Hitchcock was following a strong British trend in his choice of genre. Notable examples of Hitchcock's early British suspense-thriller films include The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934), his first spy-chase/romantic thriller, The 39 Steps (1935) with Robert Donat handcuffed to Madeleine Carroll and The Lady Vanishes (1938). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_thriller
Views: 328377 Remember This
Suspense: 'Til the Day I Die / Statement of Employee Henry Wilson / Three Times Murder
 
01:30:12
The aim for thrillers is to keep the audience alert and on the edge of their seats. The protagonist in these films is set against a problem -- an escape, a mission, or a mystery. No matter what sub-genre a thriller film falls into, it will emphasize the danger that the protagonist faces. The tension with the main problem is built on throughout the film and leads to a highly stressful climax. The cover-up of important information from the viewer, and fight and chase scenes are common methods in all of the thriller subgenres, although each subgenre has its own unique characteristics and methods.[8] A thriller provides the sudden rush of emotions, excitement, sense of suspense and exhilaration that drive the narrative, sometimes subtly with peaks and lulls, sometimes at a constant, breakneck pace thrills. In this genre, the objective is to deliver a story with sustained tension, surprise, and a constant sense of impending doom. It keeps the audience cliff-hanging at the "edge of their seats" as the plot builds towards a climax. Thrillers tend to be fast-moving, psychological, threatening, mysterious and at times involve larger-scale villainy such as espionage, terrorism and conspiracy. Thrillers may be defined by the primary mood that they elicit: fearful excitement. In short, if it "thrills", it is a thriller. As the introduction to a major anthology explains: " ...Thrillers provide such a rich literary feast. There are all kinds. The legal thriller, spy thriller, action-adventure thriller, medical thriller, police thriller, romantic thriller, historical thriller, political thriller, religious thriller, high-tech thriller, military thriller. The list goes on and on, with new variations constantly being invented. In fact, this openness to expansion is one of the genre's most enduring characteristics. But what gives the variety of thrillers a common ground is the intensity of emotions they create, particularly those of apprehension and exhilaration, of excitement and breathlessness, all designed to generate that all-important thrill. By definition, if a thriller doesn't thrill, it's not doing its job. " —James Patterson, June 2006, "Introduction," Thriller[9] Writer Vladimir Nabokov, in his lectures at Cornell University, said: "In an Anglo-Saxon thriller, the villain is generally punished, and the strong silent man generally wins the weak babbling girl, but there is no governmental law in Western countries to ban a story that does not comply with a fond tradition, so that we always hope that the wicked but romantic fellow will escape scot-free and the good but dull chap will be finally snubbed by the moody heroine." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_thriller
Views: 120745 Remember This
Suspense: Stand-In / Dead of Night / Phobia
 
01:27:27
The program's heyday was in the early 1950s, when radio actor, producer and director Elliott Lewis took over (still during the Wilcox/Autolite run). Here the material reached new levels of sophistication. The writing was taut, and the casting, which had always been a strong point of the series (featuring such film stars as Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Henry Fonda, Humphrey Bogart, Judy Garland, Ronald Colman, Marlene Dietrich, Eve McVeagh, Lena Horne, and Cary Grant), took an unexpected turn when Lewis expanded the repertory to include many of radio's famous drama and comedy stars — often playing against type — such as Jack Benny. Jim and Marian Jordan of Fibber McGee and Molly were heard in the episode, "Backseat Driver," which originally aired February 3, 1949. The highest production values enhanced Suspense, and many of the shows retain their power to grip and entertain. At the time he took over Suspense, Lewis was familiar to radio fans for playing Frankie Remley, the wastrel guitar-playing sidekick to Phil Harris in The Phil Harris-Alice Faye Show. On the May 10, 1951 Suspense, Lewis reversed the roles with "Death on My Hands": A bandleader (Harris) is horrified when an autograph-seeking fan accidentally shoots herself and dies in his hotel room, and a vocalist (Faye) tries to help him as the townfolk call for vigilante justice against him. With the rise of television and the departures of Lewis and Autolite, subsequent producers (Antony Ellis, William N. Robson and others) struggled to maintain the series despite shrinking budgets, the availability of fewer name actors, and listenership decline. To save money, the program frequently used scripts first broadcast by another noteworthy CBS anthology, Escape. In addition to these tales of exotic adventure, Suspense expanded its repertoire to include more science fiction and supernatural content. By the end of its run, the series was remaking scripts from the long-canceled program The Mysterious Traveler. A time travel tale like Robert Arthur's "The Man Who Went Back to Save Lincoln" or a thriller about a death ray-wielding mad scientist would alternate with more run-of-the-mill crime dramas. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_%28radio_drama%29
Views: 181693 Remember This
Week 4, continued
 
57:23
Views: 62179 CS50
The Great Gildersleeve: Leroy's School Play / Tom Sawyer Raft / Fiscal Report Due
 
01:29:30
Premiering on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGees' Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late brother-in-law's estate and took on the rearing of his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lurene Tuttle and followed by Louise Erickson and Mary Lee Robb) and Leroy Forester (Walter Tetley). The household also included a cook named Birdie. Curiously, while Gildersleeve had occasionally spoken of his (never-present) wife in some Fibber episodes, in his own series the character was a confirmed bachelor. In a striking forerunner to such later television hits as Bachelor Father and Family Affair, both of which are centered on well-to-do uncles taking in their deceased siblings' children, Gildersleeve was a bachelor raising two children while, at first, administering a girdle manufacturing company ("If you want a better corset, of course, it's a Gildersleeve") and then for the bulk of the show's run, serving as Summerfield's water commissioner, between time with the ladies and nights with the boys. The Great Gildersleeve may have been the first broadcast show to be centered on a single parent balancing child-rearing, work, and a social life, done with taste and genuine wit, often at the expense of Gildersleeve's now slightly understated pomposity. Many of the original episodes were co-written by John Whedon, father of Tom Whedon (who wrote The Golden Girls), and grandfather of Deadwood scripter Zack Whedon and Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly and Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog). The key to the show was Peary, whose booming voice and facility with moans, groans, laughs, shudders and inflection was as close to body language and facial suggestion as a voice could get. Peary was so effective, and Gildersleeve became so familiar a character, that he was referenced and satirized periodically in other comedies and in a few cartoons. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Great_Gildersleeve
Views: 84123 Remember This
Suspense: The X-Ray Camera / Subway / Dream Song
 
01:28:46
The program's heyday was in the early 1950s, when radio actor, producer and director Elliott Lewis took over (still during the Wilcox/Autolite run). Here the material reached new levels of sophistication. The writing was taut, and the casting, which had always been a strong point of the series (featuring such film stars as Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Henry Fonda, Humphrey Bogart, Judy Garland, Ronald Colman, Marlene Dietrich, Eve McVeagh, Lena Horne, and Cary Grant), took an unexpected turn when Lewis expanded the repertory to include many of radio's famous drama and comedy stars — often playing against type — such as Jack Benny. Jim and Marian Jordan of Fibber McGee and Molly were heard in the episode, "Backseat Driver," which originally aired February 3, 1949. The highest production values enhanced Suspense, and many of the shows retain their power to grip and entertain. At the time he took over Suspense, Lewis was familiar to radio fans for playing Frankie Remley, the wastrel guitar-playing sidekick to Phil Harris in The Phil Harris-Alice Faye Show. On the May 10, 1951 Suspense, Lewis reversed the roles with "Death on My Hands": A bandleader (Harris) is horrified when an autograph-seeking fan accidentally shoots herself and dies in his hotel room, and a vocalist (Faye) tries to help him as the townfolk call for vigilante justice against him. With the rise of television and the departures of Lewis and Autolite, subsequent producers (Antony Ellis, William N. Robson and others) struggled to maintain the series despite shrinking budgets, the availability of fewer name actors, and listenership decline. To save money, the program frequently used scripts first broadcast by another noteworthy CBS anthology, Escape. In addition to these tales of exotic adventure, Suspense expanded its repertoire to include more science fiction and supernatural content. By the end of its run, the series was remaking scripts from the long-canceled program The Mysterious Traveler. A time travel tale like Robert Arthur's "The Man Who Went Back to Save Lincoln" or a thriller about a death ray-wielding mad scientist would alternate with more run-of-the-mill crime dramas. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_%28radio_drama%29
Views: 65374 Remember This
Lego Worlds - Treasure Hunting with Things that go Bump in the Night. Part #4 [KM+Gaming S01E34]
 
22:14
Lego Worlds - Treasure Hunting with Things that go Bump in the Night. Part #4. Tragen continues the hunt for treasure and gold bricks. There are things out there in the dark, however, things that stand in his way. He revisits Sir Kitty and discovers a new world! This is part 4 in a series. Part 1 - https://youtu.be/l8cnyJtRshk Part 2 - https://youtu.be/jhcNNP25OL0 Part 3 - https://youtu.be/Wu9E-h73BNA Check out our All LEGO playlist for more lego worlds videos and any other LEGO related videos we have done https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KqbvsQJvf84&list=PLoGP4ZDuz55yscyKKZBNewnsXimqk6AzG As of this video published, per wikipedia: "Lego Worlds is a Lego sandbox game developed by Traveller's Tales and published by Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment. The game allows players to build constructions in a 3D procedurally generated world. A beta version of the game was released on 1 June 2015 on Steam Early Access. It was released on 7 March 2017 for Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One. A version for Nintendo Switch will be released at an unspecified future date. ESRB rated: E 10+ "Content Descriptors: Cartoon Violence Other: Online Interactions Not Rated by the ESRB (Windows PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One) Rating Summary: This is an adventure game in which players explore various landscapes and use Lego bricks to create buildings, mountains, islands, and objects. Players complete quests that involve collecting items, building structures, completing tasks, and defeating enemies. Characters use swords, pistols, and turrets to shoot at enemies or engage in melee-style combat. Characters break into Lego pieces when their health meters are depleted. Some of the violence occurs from a first-person perspective, and players have the ability to attack non-adversary figures (e.g., creatures, animals, Lego people), though this behavior is not encouraged/rewarded." Thanks for Watching another fun family friendly video! See you in the next video!!! https://www.youtube.com/c/KidMattersTV Subscribe for more, it's FREE! And Never Miss a video by Hitting that Bell Icon! ▶︎https://www.youtube.com/c/KidMattersTV?sub_confirmation=1 Watch More, from our Various Playlists: ▶︎https://www.youtube.com/c/kidmatterstv/playlists Follow Us On Social Media: ▶︎Twitter: https://twitter.com/KidMatters_TV ▶︎Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kidmatterstv/ ▶︎Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kidmatters_tv/ Fan Mail: KidMattersTV P.O. Box 1872 Manchester CT 06042-9998 Open Source Software we use: OBS Studio: https://obsproject.com GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program): https://www.gimp.org Blender (3D graphics and video editing): https://www.blender.org Audacity: https://www.audacityteam.org Handbrake: https://handbrake.fr OpenShot Video Editor: https://www.openshot.org About KidMatters+TV: KidMatters+TV is a Family Friendly Gaming Channel for everyone of all ages to enjoy! Primarily focused on family audience. Our videos are intended to be entertaining and educational for kids (family friendly/No swearing). Games, museums, adventures, crafts, experiments, toys, healthy cooking, and all things that matter to kids! We are a family of SEVEN: Gabe, Tragen, Roxy, Marcus, Hadrian, Mom, and Dad. The kids inspiration to start their own channel came from their favorite YouTubers (DanTDM, EthanGamer, Nerdy Nummies, Stampylongnose, Cookie Swirl C, and others). Important: This channel is edited and owned by the KidMatters+TV parents in accordance with YouTube rules. All communication will be monitored by their parents and any messages returned will be supervised by their parents. Contact Info: [email protected] KidMatters+TV [KM+Gaming S01E34] [CC] Closed Captions (Translations / Subtitles) are available in the following languages: Afrikaans Albanian Amharic Arabic Azerbaijani Bangla Bosnian Bulgarian Catalan Chinese (Simplified) Chinese (Traditional) Croatian Czech Danish Dutch English Esperanto Estonian Filipino Finnish French Galician Georgian German Greek Gujarati Hausa Hebrew Hindi Hungarian Icelandic Igbo Indonesian Irish Italian Japanese Javanese Kannada Kazakh Khmer Korean Kurdish Kyrgyz Lao Latvian Lithuanian Malagasy Malay Malayalam Marathi Mongolian Nepali Norwegian Pashto Persian Polish Portuguese Punjabi Romanian Russian Scottish Gaelic Serbian Shona Sindhi Sinhala Slovak Somali Southern Sotho Spanish Sundanese Swahili Swedish Tajik Tamil Telugu Thai Turkish Ukrainian Urdu Uzbek Vietnamese Welsh Xhosa Yoruba Zulu Please HELP us have accurate Translations: This video: http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_video?ref=share&v=KqbvsQJvf84 Our channel: http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UCkpFfjCLRUX9E62zJ1-r4Gg&tab=2 These were originally machine translated from the manually transcribed english file. So if you speak a foreign language, please help verify the accuracy of the closed captions/translations. Thanks for all your help.
Views: 3766 KidMattersTV
The Great Gildersleeve: Fish Fry / Gildy Stays Home Sick / The Green Thumb Club
 
01:29:30
Premiering on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGees' Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late brother-in-law's estate and took on the rearing of his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lurene Tuttle and followed by Louise Erickson and Mary Lee Robb) and Leroy Forester (Walter Tetley). The household also included a cook named Birdie. Curiously, while Gildersleeve had occasionally spoken of his (never-present) wife in some Fibber episodes, in his own series the character was a confirmed bachelor. In a striking forerunner to such later television hits as Bachelor Father and Family Affair, both of which are centered on well-to-do uncles taking in their deceased siblings' children, Gildersleeve was a bachelor raising two children while, at first, administering a girdle manufacturing company ("If you want a better corset, of course, it's a Gildersleeve") and then for the bulk of the show's run, serving as Summerfield's water commissioner, between time with the ladies and nights with the boys. The Great Gildersleeve may have been the first broadcast show to be centered on a single parent balancing child-rearing, work, and a social life, done with taste and genuine wit, often at the expense of Gildersleeve's now slightly understated pomposity. Many of the original episodes were co-written by John Whedon, father of Tom Whedon (who wrote The Golden Girls), and grandfather of Deadwood scripter Zack Whedon and Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly and Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog). The key to the show was Peary, whose booming voice and facility with moans, groans, laughs, shudders and inflection was as close to body language and facial suggestion as a voice could get. Peary was so effective, and Gildersleeve became so familiar a character, that he was referenced and satirized periodically in other comedies and in a few cartoons. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Great_Gildersleeve
Views: 83231 Remember This
Suspense: The 13th Sound / Always Room at the Top / Three Faces at Midnight
 
01:29:00
The program's heyday was in the early 1950s, when radio actor, producer and director Elliott Lewis took over (still during the Wilcox/Autolite run). Here the material reached new levels of sophistication. The writing was taut, and the casting, which had always been a strong point of the series (featuring such film stars as Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Henry Fonda, Humphrey Bogart, Judy Garland, Ronald Colman, Marlene Dietrich, Eve McVeagh, Lena Horne, and Cary Grant), took an unexpected turn when Lewis expanded the repertory to include many of radio's famous drama and comedy stars — often playing against type — such as Jack Benny. Jim and Marian Jordan of Fibber McGee and Molly were heard in the episode, "Backseat Driver," which originally aired February 3, 1949. The highest production values enhanced Suspense, and many of the shows retain their power to grip and entertain. At the time he took over Suspense, Lewis was familiar to radio fans for playing Frankie Remley, the wastrel guitar-playing sidekick to Phil Harris in The Phil Harris-Alice Faye Show. On the May 10, 1951 Suspense, Lewis reversed the roles with "Death on My Hands": A bandleader (Harris) is horrified when an autograph-seeking fan accidentally shoots herself and dies in his hotel room, and a vocalist (Faye) tries to help him as the townfolk call for vigilante justice against him. With the rise of television and the departures of Lewis and Autolite, subsequent producers (Antony Ellis, William N. Robson and others) struggled to maintain the series despite shrinking budgets, the availability of fewer name actors, and listenership decline. To save money, the program frequently used scripts first broadcast by another noteworthy CBS anthology, Escape. In addition to these tales of exotic adventure, Suspense expanded its repertoire to include more science fiction and supernatural content. By the end of its run, the series was remaking scripts from the long-canceled program The Mysterious Traveler. A time travel tale like Robert Arthur's "The Man Who Went Back to Save Lincoln" or a thriller about a death ray-wielding mad scientist would alternate with more run-of-the-mill crime dramas. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_%28radio_drama%29
Views: 216339 Remember This
Roswell Incident: Department of Defense Interviews - Jesse Marcel / Vern Maltais
 
01:34:19
Mac Brazel, who discovered the debris which sparked the Roswell UFO incident, died in 1963, well before researchers started to interview witnesses to the incident. More on Roswell: https://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=UTF8&tag=tra0c7-20&linkCode=ur2&linkId=c0acc2e4e8ce51a93978f4e7a66d8994&camp=1789&creative=9325&index=books&keywords=roswell However, he was interviewed in 1947 and his accounts of debris appeared in the Roswell Daily Record on July 9, 1947. In the interview he said he found "bright wreckage made up of rubber strips, tinfoil, a rather tough paper and sticks". Jesse Marcel was approached by researchers in 1978 and he recounted details suggesting the debris Brazel had led him to was exotic. He believed the true nature of the debris was being suppressed by the military. His accounts were featured in the 1979 documentary UFOs are Real, and in a February 1980 National Enquirer article, which are largely responsible for making the Roswell incident famous by sparking renewed interest. There was all kinds of stuff—small beams about three eighths or a half inch square with some sort of hieroglyphics on them that nobody could decipher. These looked something like balsa wood, and were about the same weight, except that they were not wood at all. They were very hard, although flexible, and would not burn....One thing that impressed me about the debris was the fact that a lot of it looked like parchment. It had little numbers with symbols that we had to call hieroglyphics because I could not understand them. They could not be read, they were just like symbols, something that meant something, and they were not all the same, but the same general pattern, I would say. They were pink and purple. They looked like they were painted on. These little numbers could not be broken, could not be burned. I even took my cigarette lighter and tried to burn the material we found that resembled parchment and balsa, but it would not burn—wouldn't even smoke. But something that is even more astonishing is that the pieces of metal that we brought back were so thin, just like tinfoil in a pack of cigarettes. I didn't pay too much attention to that at first, until one of the boys came to me and said: "You know that metal that was in there? I tried to bend the stuff and it won't bend. I even tried it with a sledgehammer. You can't make a dent on it," Marcel said. Second-hand accounts from Alice Knight and Vern Maltais show descriptions which suggest dummies again, and an uncertainty about the date of occurrence. "I don't recall the date," said Knight. "Their heads were hairless," said Maltais, and their clothing was "one-piece and gray in color."[19] (p. 58-9) A first-hand account from Gerald Anderson similarly offered descriptions that seemingly matched dummies: "thought they were plastic dolls," he said. He also described a "blimp," further suggesting a misidentified military recovery operation.[19] (p. 61) A description of a "jeep-like truck that had a bunch of radios in it" sounds very much like a modified Dodge M-37 utility truck not used until 1953, further suggesting a confusion about dates. The Air Force report concluded: "The descriptions examined here, provided by UFO theorists themselves, were so remarkably -- and redundantly -- similar to these Air Force projects that the only reasonable conclusion can be that the witnesses described these activities."[19] (p. 68) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_Force_reports_on_the_Roswell_UFO_incident
Views: 34220 The Film Archives

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